Awk Nawk Krob Learning Park  

 The purpose of Awk Nawk Krob Learning Park (‘Outside the Box’ or ‘Beyond the confines of the Box’ in Thai) intends to offer learners and educators the opportunities by which they directly experience the unique ‘out-of-the-box’ dynamics that characterize progressive education and the joys of learning it offers. Progressive education’s response to this complex, confounding and often unpredictable world necessarily involves the cultivation of an equally agile, quick and perceptive mind that is capable of creative, deeply caring, and unusual approaches to problem-solving.

Awk Nawk Krob Learning Park’s location in Hadyai, is set in the lap of pristine nature that offers itself as a living laboratory within which to observe a complex and fascinating web of energies in live interaction. Awk Nawk Krob’s specially trained facilitators guide learners through a rich variety of learning experiences that encourage curiosity, wonder, keen observation, clarity of analytical thought, and collaborative, rather than competitive, learning. Science provides the knowledge base, and Thai-English is the bilingual medium of communication and instruction.

 The programme comprises a four-day in-residence package of experiences for students of Grades 5, 6 of Prathom, and 1, 2 of Mathayom. We invite the heads of schools and the steering institutions in Thai education to participate in full measure.

Awk Nawk Krob Programme Modules

Duration of workshop: 3 nights & 4 days per batch of 50 students.

Venue: Awk Nawk Krob Learning Park, Suan Saai Naam, T. Hadyai, A. Hadyai, Thailand

The Curriculum of programmes at Awk Nawk Krob is carefully designed to offer a range of memorable exposures, opportunities and experiences that bring alive our everyday world into a miraculous and fascinating reality that usually goes unnoticed because of the rigid and unimaginative learning environment at school, tuition classes and home. Now suddenly, the whole world comes alive with wonder, mystery and magic; and the meaningless drudgery of school lessons and homework is replaced by a new meaning and purpose.

The Awk Nawk Krob Curriculum comprises Activity Modules that employ various modes of learning to invite the student’s latent intelligence into a creative and meaningful problem-solving mode. The purpose of each Activity Module is as given here:

  1. OBSERVATION ACTIVITIES: Students are invited through novel experiences to acutely observe that which they are experiencing. Keen, impartial observation and documentation is fundamental to inculcating the scientific temper.

  2. INVESTIGATION & CONCEPT-BUILDING ACTIVITIES: Live Investigation of natural phenomena and Concept-building exercises based on that which is observed is the central purpose of this activity.

  3. EXPERIMENTATION ACTIVITIES: Through laboratory-type experiments, students learn the use of deductive logic to arrive at an understanding of that which is being studied.

  4. LIFE SKILLS ACTIVITIES: Putting to use in daily life that which has been learned, gives life a new meaning and purpose.

  5. GAMING ACTIVITIES: Educative games from the world’s cultural traditions become the medium through which the ancients pass on their knowledge and wisdom to our younger generations.

  6. ACTION-MEDITATION: The central purpose of this activity is to turn one’s attention to the instrument within us by which we perceive experience and understand the world around us. To learn through direct observation, the instrument’s structure, ways, habits and preferences that shape and colour that which is perceived.

  7. THE ‘WEB OF LIFE’ ACTIVITIES: This web-building exercise throws light on the magical web that connects everything there is.

  8. CRAFT TIME ACTIVITIES: Through the introduction of elementary craft skills, humble everyday materials are transformed into magical toys that demonstrate physics in action.

  9. ‘MEET Khun THUM DAI’: It is always exhilarating to encounter unusual people with unusual abilities who show to be possible, that which we took to be impossible. This activity offers students with such an opportunity.

  10. ‘THE SOURCE & END OF THINGS’ ACTIVITIES: Modern-day living distances us from the source of the products we consume. The intention here is to investigate backwards to discover the source of commonplace products from our daily life.

  11. ‘THE HIDDEN ORDER’ ACTIVITIES: Math, a usually frightening subject, is explored in the happy hours given to music, rhythm and dance.

  12. ‘MAPS IN THE BRAIN’ ACTIVITIES: Unknown to us, the brain is continually building maps to enable it to make meaningful connections between what it knows and new inputs it receives. Activities related to this fascinating preoccupation of the brain reveal what it is up to, and help the student to discover ways by which the brain can function with effortless efficiency.

Awk Nawk Krob Activities

Unlike a standard time-table of ‘boxed’ academic subjects, ANK’s Activity Modules point to the real nature of things: that everything is inseparably intertwined and inseparably related. In actual implementation, therefore, the many Activity Modules listed above, are not mutually exclusive. Instead, any one activity is treated as an amalgam of several other listed activities that create a multifaceted and dynamic learning experience. For instance, the ‘Source & End of Things’ activity is seamless integrated with field trips, observation skills, demonstrations, laboratory-type experimentation, craft time, and so on.

To help visualize how such concepts transpire in practice, below are some concrete examples:

Nature Walks and Observation Activities

Core Intent: Getting out of classrooms and witnessing nature in the Learning Park’s surroundings can be a captivating sensorial and intellectual experience for youngsters accustomed to city life. Apart from observing the physical demands on the body, walking into natural settings is to enter a vast living laboratory in which students, like little scientists observe and investigate into natural phenomena they are yet to abstractly understand.

Activity: Through the magnifying glass brought along to observe en route specimens, students discover a vast miniature world that normally slips our attention and appreciation: an endless variety of life forms, unusual mushrooms, insects, wild flowers and strange looking plants.

Depending on the age group, an appropriate level of knowledge inputs that find several parallels with the school curriculum, are demonstratively introduced: the evolution of life forms, the plant and animal worlds, ecosystems and the web of life, the physics of temperature, humidity, pressure and volume relationships, the geography of weather and climate patterns, seasons, diurnal rhythms… the possibilities are endless. The aim is not to teach what should be learnt, but rather to stimulate an enquiry-based learning process, whereby a student’s scientific and questioning mind is invoked to find the causes at work.

The Source and End of Things

Chewing gum in all its myriad flavours, colours and shapes, is a popular pastime among youth in particular. Fascinating as it turns out, hardly any of us would guess that the chewing gum is closely related to a rather common fruit in Thailand: the deliciously sweet Sapota (Lamut in Thai)! Gum is made from the latex of the Sapodilla tree, the fruit of which is the Sapota. Have relished and discarded the chewing gum, who ever knows where it ends up?

Core Intent: Convenience apart, the unfortunate flip-side in today’s world of ready-to-use and ready-to-throw products is the lack of consciousness about the where things come from, and where they end up. It is not difficult to see that, in part, the devastating damage to the earth’s biosphere caused by man’s activity, is a direct consequence of this ignorance. At ANK, we are in consonance with progressive education’s vision that wishes to instill a deep and caring sensitivity among youngsters to the fragility of the earth.

Activity: The aim of this activity is to engage students in investigating backwards to the source of commonplace product/s found in their daily environment: rubber gloves, mineral water bottles, rice, cement concrete, sugar, paper, and so on. The investigation necessarily involves field trips to where the raw material is sourced, and to production spots, both industrial and domestic where the raw material is turned into the finished product we are all familiar with. At the other end of the chain, field trips follow the discarded product to where it finally ends up. En route, keen observation of the processes involved, documentation of all that is observed, experimentation with making the product on a domestic scale, all go to add immense value to the learning experience.

Meet Khun Tham Dai

Core Intent: ‘Normal’ routine life is only possible within the realm of the familiar. Our activities within this familiar world neither demand nor involve too much of our conscious effort or attention. But what if a surprise element, especially an unpleasant one, creeps in? What is one to do?

Challenges appear to us as those that are either ‘possible to deal with’, or ‘not possible to deal with’. Then, to cloud the picture, there are situations that appear possible but turn out impossible, and those that appear not possible, but are made possible. How is one to know?

Activity: This activity introduces students to individuals who we will call the Mr./Ms. ‘Possible’ (Khun Tham Dai, in Thai). These gritty individuals who, challenged by a particularly difficult predicament in their lives, have through sheer dint of courage, perseverance, hard work, and some brilliant resourceful thinking, have made the ‘not possible’ into ‘possible’.

For instance, meet Ms. ‘Possible’, a severely handicapped person with a body so contorted that it is difficult to imagine how she performs even the simplest of survival tasks. Yet she eats rice using chopsticks between the toes of her shriveled feet, without ever spilling a grain!

After an eye-popping demonstration by Ms.’Possible’ of unthinkable ways in which she performs routine tasks, she regales them with anecdotes from her life to show what it took her to master the unusual abilities she has. Now, students are encouraged to attempt performing routine and familiar tasks in an unfamiliar manner. ‘For a starter, try brushing your teeth with your left hand (if you are a right-handed person). A truly messy and humbling, but inspiring experience it is bound to be. What hidden potentials lie within each of us, waiting to be discovered?

Gaming Activities

When gaming is made a little more structured and consciously engaged in, it can become a powerful learning tool to uncover the nature of things around and within us.

Predator & Prey

It is no surprise that mothers in the animal kingdom (us included) employ gaming to enjoyably teach vital life skills to their young.

Predator & Prey’ is an ancient popular game found across world cultures in slightly differing forms. When played in a graded manner from simple to increasingly challenging versions, this game acquires great depth and significance in the context of daily living.

Version 1:

Participants: Any even number from 20 to 50

Facilitators: 4

Props: A small stuffed toy each, of a predator (dog, cat, lion, fox, snake etc) and its prey (frog, rat, bird,rabbit, deer etc)

The Game:

  • The participants are divided into 2 groups:
  • Group 1 represents the hungry predator, who must hunt to stay alive, and
  • Group 2 represents the frightened prey who must run to stay alive.
  • The predator chases the prey and ends the game when it catches up with the latter.
  • Team swap sides, and repeat the game.
  • The winner team is the one who takes less time to catch the prey.

How to play the game:

  • Participants form a circle by holding hands, and do a number count. Odds face outside, evens face inside the circle.
  • Odds, from now on called Group 1, represent the predator, and Evens, now called Group 2, the prey.
  • The predator toy is given to a participant in group1, and the prey toy to a participant in group 2 and diagonally opposite the predator.
  • When the time-keeper (facilitator) announces ‘start’, the predator and prey toys are to be passed from hand to hand in the same direction, among members of the predator and prey circles respectively.
  • Facilitators stand outside the circle in four directions, ensuring that the toys are always received and passed on rapidly by each participant, always using both hands.
  • Deliberate attempts to slow or stall the passage of the toys will be considered penalty points.
  • The race of the predator to catch up with the prey in the inner circle, ends when the gap between them closes and the participant in circle 1 touches the participant in circle 2 who’s holding the prey.
  • The time taken to close in and end the game is the benchmark score that must be beaten in the next round when the predator and prey teams exchange turns.
  • The score of the second predator team ends this version of the game, the winner being the team who took finish in lesser time.

Some ideas for Discussion:

Facilitators provide the questions that provoke the participants to think of issues that surfaced but went unnoticed during the game.

Some examples:

  • Whose side would you like to be on, predator or prey? Why?
  • Can you recall the feelings that ran through you when you switched roles between predator and prey?
  • Do you think the way the game is played; it favours the predator/prey a little more than prey/predator? If so, how?
  • How would you modify the game to create a more impartial game?
  • And so on…

Version 2:

  • The broad details remain the same as in Version 1, except that here, the prey is given three crisis-saving exit points into a ‘burrow’.
  • The burrow is represented by a neutral participant in the centre of the circle to whom the prey can be given when the predator catches up too close to the prey.
  • The game resumes by returning the prey to the participant, and the predator taking position diagonally opposite the position of the prey.
  • Duration of game: 10 minutes.
  • The team to use the burrow fewer times is the winner.

Some ideas for Discussion:

Is the game fair to the predator? Discuss.

How would you modify the game to allow for more chances to the predator?

Version 3:

  • The broad details remain the same as in Version 1, except that in this version there is only one circle.
  • The predator and prey are given positions diagonally opposite to one another.
  • The game involves passing the predator and prey in one direction.
  • Naturally, each participant alternately sympathises with both predator and prey.
  • The game ends with the predator closing in on the prey.

Some ideas for Discussion:

  • How did it feel to be forced to identify with both predator and prey?
  • Who did you find yourself sympathizing with? Why?
  • What does it tell us about the world of predators and preys?
  • If there is a god/creator who made all life, what do you think his/her position is?
  • What does this game tell you about life?
  • How do you think, this game affects your understanding of your own life?

 

 

Action Meditation: The World of Sound

This activity is an experiential encounter with the world of sound. It is important for participants to be told that while engaging with this activity, there must be a simultaneous awareness of the feelings that are passing their minds.

Participants: Any number from 10 to about 30

Facilitators: 4

Props: 

  1. A Sound System
  2. A recorded track on dvd
  3. Blindfolds

The Game:

  • The participants are blindfolded and seated in a large space with at least 1.5 mts between each.
  • Instructions are given to them that require them to raise the right hand when they hear a natural sound and the left when they hear a recorded sound. Likewise, the right and left hands when they hear both simultaneously, and no show of hands in complete silence.
  • Duration: 10 mts.

Discussion:

  • Were you aware of what your mind was doing when you were attentively listening? Discuss.
  • Did thoughts passed your mind? Discuss.
  • How were you able to distinguish between natural sounds and recorded sounds? Discuss.
  • What did you observe about yourself that was new/ interesting/ strange? Discuss.
  • What do you think this exercise was meant to offer? Discuss.
  • Have you watched a sleeping pet dog or cat? Do you know that they use this exercise in a certain way? Discuss.

 

 

Maps in the Brain: Touch World

One vital skill to become conscious of is the manner in which our brain constantly helps us orient ourselves to the world through map-building. In this game, we play with maps created by the brain through the sense of touch.

Version 1:

Participants: 10 players per team, any number of competing teams

Facilitators: 2

Props:

  1. A 60 cm high laundry basket
  2. Balls in at least10 sizes, and 5 balls per size
  3. PVC pipe stands, each 60 cms high with a 30cm dia base-plate, the dia of the pvc pipes to match the ball diameters, 3 stands per diameter.
  4. Chalk marker
  5. Blindfolds
  6. Timer

The Game:

The game requires the team to place the balls in pipes of matching diameter. The game is over when all balls have found their respective pipes.

  • Draw a circle of 5 mt diameter on the floor. Place the pipes in random order of size, equidistantly on the circle line.
  • Place the balls in the laundry basket that is placed at the centre of the circle.
  • Blindfold all players and lead them to the centre of the circle.
  • At the start of time marked on the alarm clock, players are required to take a ball at a time, and place it in a pipe of matching diameter, return to the circle and so on, until the basket is empty.

Disqualifications:

 

  1. Players who step outside the circle, deduct 2 points per person
  2. Unmatched ball and pipe diameters, deduct 2 points per error

Score-keeping: the score record is maintained by facilitators in terms of 3 parameters:

Parameter 1: time taken, in multiples of quarter minute

Parameter 2: players who walked out of the circle

Parameter 3: wrong matching of ball and pipe diameters.

  • A team’s score is the added total of the 3 parameters, less disqualifications.
  • The team to score least is winner.

Suggestions:

  • Get the players to remove spectacles, caps and shoes.
  • Allow for a dry run of the game without blindfolds.
  • Keep the scores for each team in two categories: without blindfolds, and with blindfolds.

Discussion:

  • Did it help to have been through a dry run? Why/why not?
  • Compare your scores for each parameter, without and with blindfolds.
  • How can you explain the difference in your scores?
  • What can you infer from these results about what the brain is doing in each case?
  • Did any of you figure out a short-cut method to improve your score, to save time, or to avoid mistakes in matching the diameter of ball and pipe? What were they?
  • How is this game related to maps and map-building?
  • Can you explain the kind of a map/maps that was/were being created in the brain?
  • Discuss.

Version 2:

Participants: Two teams A and B; 10 players per team

Facilitators: 2

Props: 

  • Shirts and trousers in a range of sizes from baby clothes to xxxl adult sizes, at least 4 per size
  • A laundry basket that can hold 20 sets of shirts and trousers
  • Chalk marker
  • Blindfolds
  • Timer

The Game:

Blindfolded players A are required to ‘clothe’ players with two sets of well-fitting shirts and trousers. Then, team B clothes A. Winners are those who take the least time.

  1. Place the laundry basket with clothes at the centre of a 5 mt. circle.
  2. Members of team B stand equidistant on the perimeter of the circle.
  3. Team A members stand around the basket.
  4. Each member of A identifies a counterpart in team B.
  5. The game requires the blindfolded players of team A to clothe their counterparts in B with 2 well-fitting shirts and 2 well-fitting trousers, taking care to pick only one garment from the basket at a time.
  6. Clothes not found matching the concerned players, are to be returned to the basket immediately.
  7. When pairs of A and B complete the task, they move out of the play area.
  8. Time taken by the last pair to finish, is the score of the team A.
  9. Now, partners B take turn to clothe their A counterparts.

Disqualifications:

  • For clothing that is worn on the counterparts that is not well-fitting, deduct 2 points per piece of clothing
  • Score-keeping: the score record is maintained by facilitators in terms of:
  • Team A: Dry run timing, less disqualifications, Final game timing, less disqualifications
  • Team B: Dry run timing, less disqualifications, Final game timing, less disqualifications
  • The team to score a lesser timing is winner.

Suggestions:

  • Get the players to remove spectacles, caps and shoes.
  • Allow for a dry run of the game without blindfolds.
  • Keep the scores for each team in two categories: without blindfolds, and with blindfolds. Facilitators are to ascertain if clothing worn by one team on their counterparts in the other team is well-fitting.

Discussion:

  • Did it help to have been through a dry run? Why/why not?
  • Compare your scores for the turns you played, without and with blindfolds.
  • How can you explain the difference in your scores?
  • What can you infer from these results about what the brain is doing in each case?
  • Did any of you figure out a short-cut method to improve your score, to save time, or to avoid mistakes in sizing the clothes? What were they?
  • In what way does this game have anything to do with map-building?
  • Can you explain the kind of a map/maps that was/were being created in the brain?
  • Discuss.

Programme Guidelines

Student intake and Teacher participation

We request that the number of students participating in each programme batch remains at 50 at the maximum. However, under special circumstances, we may consider raising the number to 60 per batch.

Accompanying Teachers

Schools are requested to send a maximum of 2 teachers per batch of students who are either class-teachers or subject-teachers of the students. The teachers are expected to bring along a list of participating students that mentions their complete names, postal addresses, and mobile numbers of parents.

Accompanying teachers will not only actively assist in regulating student activities but will also actively participate in all that is happening. We are hopeful that teachers will seize the occasion to observe and expose themselves to the manner of content presentation and teaching/learning methods employed at Awk Nawk Krob.

In addition, they will be asked to make descriptive notes of their observations based on the happenings as they see them. These observations will include details about the activities, the mood of the children, their engagement, responses to the events, as also, suggestions for improvement. All notes will be collected at the end by the Awk Nawk Krob staff and submitted to the school principal as part of our programme assessment.

Can the Awk Nawk Krob Programme be assessed?

What is concrete is quantifiable, qualifiable. So where learning is equated to providing inputs of concrete data we mistakenly call knowledge, the degree of authenticity in the data’s retention and recall on demand (as in a test at school), will be percentage score of the learner. By this premise, computers are exceedingly ‘intelligent’ learners, far superior to any human. If it sounds absurd, we are not wrong. And yet, this has been the mistaken premise on which our country’s education system is modeled; we are taught what to think, not how to think; what to do, not why to do; to obey, not to reason.

Admittedly, there are corners in education that are concrete, such as skill-building, and so are easily subject to assessment, the current methods adequately meeting this demand. But there is also this large, less concrete and more nebulous realm in which a wholly different, and superior quality of learning happens, such as in a person’s ability to ‘connect the dots’; the ability for inferential learning, insightful and resourceful thinking; there are one’s talents and aptitudes and the rich and varied inner world of emotions and feelings; and the outbursts of creativity that we all occasionally experience. No computer, dog or cat can match these qualities that are now recognized as being quintessentially human. How is education to address and nurture these? And in returning to our original question, by what earthly yardstick can these be assessed whether at ANK or at school?

Perhaps the answer lies in the nature and substance of the new understanding and meaning, as it unfolds in the learners’ mind from exposures and challenges experienced at our programmes. This understanding and meaning is best discerned through invoking the student’s mind to express itself through the many interactive formats we offer. This is also why it is so important for accompanying teachers to witness and document learning as it happens, in real time.

However, to enable eager school heads and parents to know what learning has transpired while at ANK, the students engage in an exercise of appraisal towards the end of their stay at ANK, wherein they record their new learning, express what the programme has meant to them, and so on. This reaches the school head along with the accompanying teachers’ report, and is in turn shared with the parents.

Wherever schools are amenable to the suggestion, ANK is keen that the participant students work towards a presentation which they put up before the rest of the school and the parent body.

Frequently asked questions…

What kind of accommodation and meals do you offer?

Being a 3 nights -4-days in-residence package, students will be accommodated at Stream Garden Retreat and Conference Centre’s existing facilities for guest accommodation.

Situated 45 minutes from the city of Hat Yai, Stream Garden is a well established centre nestled in a quiet and beautiful forest with perennial streams, ideal for students to explore and be close with nature.

As part of the novel educational experience, students will be required to share toilets and bathrooms, sleep in non-air conditioned spaces (although fans will be provided in warmer weather), and enjoy wholesome vegetarian food for which the Retreat Centre is famed. Students are requested not to bring along soft drinks or junk food during their stay.

What should I bring along?

A list of items to help students pack their bags will be given out. Students may also be asked to bring along props from home that will be used for the activities. These would be very simply commonplace items such as ice cream cups, milk cartons or used drinking water bottles. Other than the listed items, students are not to bring any unmentioned items.

Can I bring electronic gadgets?

We wish that parents refrain from sending electronic gadgetry such as mobile phones, games, cameras, music systems and the like. All such items will be collected from the students on arrival, and returned only at the end of the programme. However, Stream Garden’s telephones would be available at all times should there be the need to contact the parents.

We believe this temporary abstinence from soft drinks, junk food, TV, computer games and mobile phone gadgets will give students a true experience of ‘life in the raw’. It will also prepare students with the mental space to pay fuller attention to things happening within and around them.

Our staff will handle all the photography throughout the programme which will be uploaded on the ANK Facebook.

What happens if a child falls ill? Do you provide first aid and medication?

Our staff will provide medical First Aid treatment when required. However, in children with health issues such as allergies or chronic ailments, parents are required to send a descriptive note mentioning the nature of illness and the medication required. Medicines sent along with the children will be collected along with the electronic gadgetry, used when required, and returned to the student at the time of departure.

To give you a better picture of our programme below is a sample schedule.

DAY ONE

09.00 – 09.30

Arrival, short introduction, snack

09.30 – 12.00

Nature walk + packed lunch

12.00 – 14.30

Return + siesta

14.30 – 15.30

Discussions on findings from the walk + drawing activity

15.30 – 16.00

Tea break

16.00 – 17.30

Gaming Activities

17.30 – 18.30

Shower time

18.30 – 19.30

Dinner

19.30 – 20.30

Hidden Order of Things + Prepare for growing vegetables

20.30 –

Daily reflection + Bedtime

DAY TWO

06.00 – 06.30

Yoga and Simple breathing exercises

06.30 – 08.00

Shower time

08.00 – 09.00

Breakfast

09.00 – 10.30

Maps in the Brain

10.30 – 10.45

Juice break

10.45 – 12.00

Craft time activities- making handmade soap

12.00 – 13.00

Lunch

13.00 – 14.00

Siesta

14.00 – 15.30

Craft time – making handmade soap

15.30 – 16.00

Tea break

16.00 – 17.30

Life Skills (‘Cook’s Day Off’)

17.30 – 18.30

Shower time

18.30 – 19.30

Dinner

19.30 – 20.30

Meet Khun Tam Dai

20.30 –

Daily reflection + Bedtime

DAY THREE

06.00 – 06.30

Yoga and Simple breathing exercises

06.30 – 08.00

Shower time

08.00 – 09.00

Breakfast

09.00 – 10.30

Source of things: making palm sugar

10.30 – 10.45

Juice break

10.45 – 12.00

Source of Things: Making Palm Sugar

12.00 – 13.00

Lunch

13.00 – 14.00

Siesta

14.00 – 15.30

End of Things: Non organic waste separation, recycling

15.30 – 16.00

Tea break

16.00 – 17.30

End of things: Non organic waste separation, recycling

17.30 – 18.30

Shower time

18.30 – 19.30

Dinner

19.30 – 20.30

Action-meditation

20.30 –

Daily reflection + Bedtime

DAY FOUR

06.00 – 06.30

Yoga and Simple breathing exercises

06.30 – 08.00

Shower time

08.00 – 09.00

Breakfast

09.00 – 10.30

Lab type experiments: Experiments in floatation (raft making)

10.30 – 10.45

Juice break

10.45 – 12.30

Lab type experiments: Experiments in floatation (raft making)

12.30 – 13.30

Lunch

13.00 – 14.00

Siesta

14.00 – 15.30

Web of life activities

15.30 – 16.00

Preparing for departure

16.00 – end

Students depart